This Week in Africa

First we start in Zimbabwe where Robert Mugabe and Morgan Tsvangirai have finally agreed on a framework for power-sharing. I guess all those haters who thought Thabo Mbeki couldn’t do it have pies on their faces now (I’m looking at you Imperial Britain and your propaganda tool, BBC). I wonder if this is the new conflict-resolution in Africa. It sure has a lot of positive signs. Africans fixing African problems. Nice.

Speaking of Thabo Mbeki, seems like he didn’t have a good week at the end though as a judge threw out the corruption case against Jacob Zuma, Mbeki’s nemesis for the ANC leadership. Zuma and his supporters have always claimed Mbeki was out to get Zuma in order to stay as the African National Congress’ leader, which late last year chose Zuma instead of Mbeki. Ouch.

In Somalia, a member of “parliament” was assassinated in Baidoa in front of a Mosque. MP Mohamed Osman Maye, a strong alley of “President” Abdillahi Yusuf, was shot in the head as he left the Mosque after finishing Tarawih prayers, just days after critizing Abdillahi Yusuf in parliament. Can you say payback? In this case the MO fits victims of Abdillahi Yusuf’s political eradication as the MP was shot. Someone living in Baidoa told me that the opposition’s MO is to behead or decapitated their victims while Yusuf’s method of elimination is to hire hitmen and shoot the victims. Although I cannot substanciate my source’s claims, I don’t doubt this MP’s assassination order came from Abdillahi Yusuf and his goons. My source also says that the opposition, i.e. Al-Shabaab, usually gives its critic a ‘warning’ before assassination is carried out.

In Libya, finally a European colonial country admits its wrongdoing and actually accepts responsibility and commits to compensating for its 20th century sins in Africa – mainly the raping of Africa. Of course I’m referring to Italia or Italy. PM Silvio Berlusconi has singed a 5 billion euro ‘sorry’ pact for his nation’s occupation and colonization of Libya from 1911 to 1943. Berlusconi said, “It is my duty, as a head of government, to express to you in the name of the Italian people our regret and apologies for the deep wounds that we have caused you.” In a symbolic gesture, he bowed before the son of resistance hero Omar Mokhtar. The deal is that Italia will provide $200 million euro a year for the next 25 years that will cover reconstruction projects, student grants, and compensation for soldiers who served in WWII on the Italian side. Now the question is, where’s my check? My grandad didn’t lose a limb for nothing, eh. Check please!

Now something close to my heart, a blogger in Morocco was convicted, fined and sentenced to 2-years in jail for disrespecting the King by criticizing his charity programs because this particular blogger felt that the King was giving handouts and as a result, Mohamed Erraji felt that many Moroccans are becoming dependant on the King’s charity; hence turn some of these people into ‘lazy.’ OK, I believe people should express their opinions whenever they want to but this blogger knew fully well the consequences of ‘insulting’ the King in Morocco but he still did it. It turns out that he’s the sole provider for his family. Good job for endangers your family’s well-being, Mr. Erraji. He has since been given a  ‘provisional’ release.

The late Levy Mwanawasa of Zambia has finally been laid to rest. Mwanawasa was one of the good leaders of Africa. Let’s hope Zambia continues on the path set out by Levy Mwanawasa.

BONUS: A tip of the hat goes to my cocalero compadre Evo Morales as well as leftist hero Hugo Chavez. Who said Socialism is dead?

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2 thoughts on “This Week in Africa

  1. Ike Munsu

    SO very well that a deal has been reached in Zimbabwe. But at what cost? How many innocent Zimbabweans needlessly died? Which ever way one looks at it, Mbeki has been disappointing. This will blight, rather than enhance his legacy.

  2. Om

    Ike,

    You can either look at this deal as a progress for African conflict-resolution framework that has prevented an awful future for Zimbabwe (Kenya as well) or you can dwell on what happened up till this point (I’m in no way belittling or disregarding the loss of life and suffering of those involved) but if these two men did not compromise, what do you reckon the future of Zimbabweans would look like?

    This is not a perfect solution but it’s the best solution Africa has ever come up with for its leadership/domestic problems. I wish this will be an example for Congo, Somalia, and Sudan to follow for its internal conflicts. I believe Africans ought to fix their own political/domestic problems, without interference or influence from the West, which you must admit hasn’t done any good for Africa. If you believed the drumbeat of “foreign intervention” propagated by the BBC and its master Britain, then I don’t think we have any ground to continue this discussion.

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